Tuesday , November 24 2020

Defiant England coach Farrell supports it to avoid the link



Contradiction: Andre Esterhuizent is England's Owen Farrell (right) on Saturday's Twickenham. Photo: EPA / Facundo Arrizabalaga

Contradiction: Andre Esterhuizent is England's Owen Farrell (right) on Saturday's Twickenham. Photo: EPA / Facundo Arrizabalaga

England head coach Eddie Jones celebrates after the game on Saturday. Photo: REUTERS / Toby Melville

England head coach Eddie Jones celebrates after the game on Saturday. Photo: REUTERS / Toby Melville

LONDON – England coach Eddie Jones backed Owen Farrell to avoid referring to dangerous gambling that could exclude the New Zealand confrontation next week.

Farrell shot a British side that lost several leading players with a point, with three successful fines seven minutes in Twickenham.

But eventually there was a drama when 80 minutes into the hour, Judge Angus Gardner asked the official TV officer officer to see if Farrell had misunderstood illegal "no-arms" tackle with Springbok Andre Esterhuizen.

The Australian official could have won the South African punishment, which, if he had missed, would have seen the visitors win their victory in their European tour of the tournament.

De Gardner, despite the current dangerous game of World Rugby, finally decided not to penalize Farrell's challenge despite the fact that the English captain seemed to be on his shoulder.

However, this does not necessarily mean that the announcer Keith Brown, who is from New Zealand himself, decides 24 hours after the final whistle of the Sabbath to decide whether further disciplinary action should be taken.

However, a sarcastic Jones said, "When you are 15 at the age of 15 you can do something you did, nothing can happen, I have no idea what can happen," he added.

The frustrated Springbok coach, Rassie Erasmus, continued to worry about Farrell's challenge: "If they're all legitimate – and I did not look good at replaying – then we have to start the solution."

England finishes a five-time losing streak, the last of which was in Spring, 25 to 10 win in spring in spring.

Fair to say ... Owen Farrell is not Springboks favorite Angola on Saturday. Photo: BackpagePix
Fair to say … Owen Farrell is not Springboks favorite Angola on Saturday. Photo: BackpagePix

But now, on November 10, Twickenham fights for two consecutive wins after clashing with All Blacks.

"You want to booty"

Jones, however, was in a mood when asked if Saturday's success had been the most important victory in England's shortest three years.

"The most important thing is what we do," said the Australian. "I do not understand these guys, we're a bloody good team, we lost a few games, played hard and won.

"Why do you have to be the most important game because you're the guy (the media) wanting to sneak for why? You're going to do some level, you know, if you stay long enough, you're going to re-engage, so you'll be happy one day. "

It was the first match in England, as Jones had made the former All Blacks coach John Mitchellet a defense officer for his back crew.

Jones was pleased that his team limited Springboks to the wing of Sob Nkosi, even though he did not even own his own, Elliot Daly, who gave a long-term punishment to Farrell's trio.

"When you get into the arm-wrestling, someone gives it, we did not give it up," Jones said.

"Appropriate Game" Against New Zealand

The former Australian and Japanese coach, however, expressed concern about another match where England was ruled by a series of penalties and Maro Itoje was locked in the first half.

Eddie Jones: If you get into the arms you need to give. We did not give. Photo: Toby Melville / Reuters
Eddie Jones: If you get into the arms you need to give. We did not give. Photo: Toby Melville / Reuters

"You must be incredibly disciplined to overcome the New Zealanders," he said. "(And) you must understand your weaknesses."

England has not played a dominant world champion in New Zealand since 2014 and was expected to be rolled out next week in the upcoming Japanese World Cup next year.

"New Zealand is another kettle for Springbok," Jones said, Australia coach when he lost the 2003 finals of the 2003 World Cup in England in Sydney and held an advisor for 2007 World Champion Springboks.

"They want the game to be an athletic race, we will not wear symbols and shorts, but the play of rugby."

Agence France-Presse (AFP)


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