Friday , January 27 2023

Jakob Markstrom closes the door, Canucks strikes the second wide opening



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The last time Vancouver Canucks played St. Louis Blues, they knocked them down with their worst season's victory thanks to some speed and really terrible sweat from Blues.

Like "I'm Henry Eighth, I'm" or "Judy's Punk," he was the second verse, the same as the first on Thursday night in Vancouver. Instead of 6-1, Canucks won 5-1, but everything else was pretty much the same, just to Blues, which actually had a strong start that was stopped by Jacob Markstrom.

Do you remember when Jake Allen was good? I do not think morally good, since I'm not here to make ethical assessments of him as a human being – I'm sure it's mostly fine, with the pockets of evil that are constantly bothering in cracks in their psyche, just like the rest of us – but well in hockey meaning.

Ever since 2013, Alen has won the Aldege "Baz" Bastien Memorial Avard for the most important goalkeeper in AHL. St. Louis Blues needs to be thrilled. Here it is, their destination for the future.

It's been a while. It had a savings of 0.920 in 2015. In Plaioff in 2017, he stole a series from the Minnesota Wild and completed a postseason with a .935 save percentage. He was inconsistent, sure, but when he was involved, Alen could keep his best league in the league.

Since then, it has descended.

Alen had an ugly 906 percent of last year's savings and you could easily claim that he was the main reason Blues missed the playoffs for just one point. This season was even worse: the percentage of savings of 8,998, the worst in the NHL among the goalkeepers with at least 20 starts this season.

He did not help his case against Canucks, with a percentage of savings of .857 when I was watching this game.

  • The canoes were terrible in the first period. Sorry, that's not quite right: Canucks, except for Jakob Markstrom, were horrible in the first period.
  • Counting in the first 20 minutes – 15-5 in favor of Blues – it was generous to Canucks. Two "shootings" were from their own Canucks – the expansion of Chris Taney and Ben Hutton. This left three Canucks goals from the offensive zone, and none was 30 meters away from the net.
  • Luckily for Canucks, Markstrom was ready immediately after cracking. As a sword that Hattori Hanzo erected, Markstrom was incredibly sharp, but also polite and well-balanced. John Garrett praised him for his "quiet feet", which is the exact sum of his economic movements in the network, making every safe look easy. In the first period he made 15 saves and allowed only one goal per 30 bullets, but only lost the lead to Vladimir Tarasenko.
  • Travis Green has obviously allowed Canucks to know how bad they played during the first break and seem to fall on careful ears. The canoes dominated in the second period to the same extent as Blues dominated the first, ahead of the Blues 14-3. The only difference is that Jake Allen was not the sword of Hattori Hanzo; He was more than a glass knife.
  • The real sign that Canucks dominated earlier in that period were not gunshots, but the way they were sentenced by their possession of hell in the offensive zone. Antoine Roussel continued to move and made the first penalty for two minutes, and then Bo Horvat pulled out an interferential fine a few minutes later, as he shook the backbone.
  • Horvat opened the scoring on the powerful game he drew, but it was the dog Elias Pettersson who was rightly praised and praised, as well as a really fantastic finger from Horvat. Pettersson pulled the hell out as if he were going to control him and look for options, but instead he immediately dismissed Horvat on the background, which simply had to be firm on his stick to redirect him home.
  • Half a minute later, another Canucks tennis player joined the scoring. Joel Edmundson was blocked by the first Gaudet's first hit from a hurry, but Gaudette held it for the regiment. After removing the hell from Rob Thomas, Gaudette made him Min Voo Lee and drove him over Allen's leg.
  • Gaudette almost got another one in the third period, but Alen pulled out some of the old magic, slipping over to rob Gaudette after giving up his return to Derrick Pouliot. In some games, such savings can be a turning point, keeping the score close, so that your callers can return. In this game, it just delayed the inevitability.
  • Not long after the fantastic savings, Allen gave up the absolute tombster Josh Leivo, who shot two meters behind the goal and caught him in the back of Alen. Usually when you hit someone in numbers, you risk a penalty, not a naked goal. It was also deliberate, while Leivo noticed Allen leaning from the post and betting Larry Bird to Big Mac that he could pay. Nothing but the net.
  • Vladimir Tarasenko has 150 goals in the last four seasons. Now it's suddenly a matter of trade rumors, as if the problem in St. Louis. The guy can still score goals, even if this season starts on a rocky start. He rode around Gaudette, escaped Chris Tane's stick as he cut in front and put the ball in Markstrom for a unique goal of Blues.
  • Jake Virtanen set up a new career with high goals, scored his 11th season on a face-to-face match with Horvat, similar to a goal scored by Boeser against Philadelphia Fliers. Virtanen turned to the top of the zone, while Lou Eriksson set up a shop in front of Allen. Seeing that Eriksson showed his products to sell passers-by, he must be extremely disgusting with Allen, who never seemed to be seeing Virtanen's blow.
  • The crowd broke into singing "Shotgun Jake!" Rifle Jake! "After the goal, the Canucks steadfastly escaped acknowledging the growing # ShotgunJake movement, perhaps worried about promoting fast alcohol consumption for their young, impressive fans. If that's the case, he sends a mixed message that the famous gif has released after Virtanen's goals at Canucks Twitter is characterized by the Budweiser Red Light wing And theirs post-games emphasize are also sponsored by Budweiser.
  • Goalkeeper Loui Eriksson looked like a karmic prize for a strong game. He helped Canucks to perfect the penalty of killing, giving them 20 successful killings, played the role of turning 5-to-5 against the Tarasenko line and secured the screen for Virtanen's goal. All in all, a neat, detailed game from a veteran, whom Green quickly boasted post-game: "This is the best thing I saw him playing."

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