Friday , January 27 2023

Hepatitis C, silence disease with irreversible damage



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hepatitis C
Hepatitis C is a disease that should be considered a public health problem, said specialist Aldo Torre Delgadillo. Photo: Illustrative

Mexico, December 20 (Notimek) .- Hepatitis C is a disease that should be considered a public health problem, said Aldo Torre Delgadillo, head of the High Healing and Liver Transplant Clinic of the National Institute of Medical Sciences and Food Salvador Zubiran (INCMNSZ) .

A specialist in gastroenterology and hepatology explained that this disease is considered to be "silent" without symptoms and it can take up to 20 years to manifest itself. However, he warned, it can lead to irreversible damage to health.

He confirmed that in Mexico there is the purpose of eliminating this disease through an appropriate diagnosis to support those who suffer from it.

Torre Delgadilllo was the co-ordinator of the Forum "Second Precept: An Integrated Approach to Hepatitis C in Mexico", organized by Hepatology and the Transplant Unit of the hepatic gastroenterology department INCMNSZ.

In a statement, the specialist said that according to the World Health Organization (WHO) report, 399,000 deaths from hepatitis C related diseases, noting that there are currently more than 400,000 Mexicans living with the infection, and only 20% of them are diagnosed.

He added that it is necessary that most patients diagnose themselves to start treatment on time, especially those who used injections or inhalation drugs at some time in their life, transfused before 1995, had tattoos or piercing, or if they were infected by the virus human immunodeficiency (HIV).

"Thanks to science, innovation and evidence-based medicine, several countries have made progress on this issue, but in the case of Mexico there are no strategies aimed at preventing and reporting diseases," he added.

In that sense, he explained that, thanks to special treatments like the so-called Pan-genotypes, Mexico could achieve WHO targets that seek to reduce up to 90 percent of the number of new cases of hepatitis C and 65 percent mortality for 2030.

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