Saturday , July 24 2021

Hinemoa Elder: Our lessons in leadership from our powerful mocopauna



I was inspired by the right guidance of some of our young people in Hoana Vaiti Marae, writes Dr Hinemoa Elder.

DAVID VHITE / STUFF

I was inspired by the right guidance of some of our young people in Hoana Vaiti Marae, writes Dr Hinemoa Elder.

OPINION: Rangati mo apopo, the leaders of the future, is a vhakatauki used to describe young people. It is often heard in a modified form that indicates that leaders are still today, inaianei.

I was inspired by the right leadership of some of our young people on Monday. As part of the Brain Research NZ research, we were in the presence of Te Kura Kaupapa Maori's student on Hoana. Let me take you there.

I'm standing in a tomokanga, at the entrance, in Hoana Vaititi marae. Waiting for the carang that will draw us out and which, along with one of our esteemed bitch, Dr Vaiora Port, will answer. This is our third year of vanang with the total submersion of Kura.

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I stand there, at that moment, perfectly aware of all the stories and all the people who led me to that precise moment. Have you ever had one of those moments when you felt all the connections in your life? This is one of those.

What follows is remarkable exchange, exhilaration, ritual encounters.

I am there as some sort of participant between our ethnic cultures, our generational cultures. I know this is the first marae vanang for some of our neuroscientists. Some of them told me that they feel upset and afraid to cause a foul. And slowly over time, above every vanang, it grows in confidence. Using his ashes. Relaxation and adjustment in vhakaaro Maori, Maori thinking.

We are working hard to create real relationships between our partners from the Maori community at Brain Research NZ. At this stage we have two, one is with this vhanau. The other one is with the wool of Puketeraki Marae in Karitana.

One of the key difficulties in the existing financing model for health research is that when the investigation is completed, it is the end of the relationship with the participants of the Maori or stakeholders, in most cases.

So, we do not rely on the flurry of research projects to support these relationships. We are in favor of long-term relations with our partners in the Maori community, because this is our priority. And that is the expectation in our contract with the Higher Education Commission.

There are so many strong reasons for doing this: By encouraging our students to think about a career in science, to see such jobs and see how they will improve them. In the end, they will determine the research program, improve our research, so it can provide real benefits for the Maori. Supporting our Career Researchers Maori.

One of the key topics of the day highlighted by the tauir was the recognition of the vital role of mocopauna. Flour, traditional mark, also person; and full, spring, pool, and verb full, meaning stream.

An unbreakable bond between a grandmother and a grandfather that manifests in the characteristics of a grandson. For me, this also alludes to the inexhaustible source of life between granddaughter and grandfather. So you see how vital the connection is between the mocopauna, granddaughter and their grandfathers, and approximately in the very word. Our discussions are based on the vital role of their grandchildren that affect the health and well-being of their babies and grandfathers.

Perhaps it would seem weird, given that we are the center of research excellence "brain aging", to think about the relationship between generations. It's a perfect sense for me. One thing, the brain starts aging from the moment of conception?

And if we empower the young with knowledge, we are already working on prevention. These vanguards are invaluable in challenging conventional thinking about what the concept of "brain aging" could mean. And for the institutions of neuroscience these discussions, with uranium, with Kura, with tauir, are new in this way.

Lessons in leadership, coming from their grandchildren, these mocopains. Plus, you have to be the witness of their performance! Leadership, next level.


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