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Protest protest in December for higher wages



Trade unions are trying to improve the salaries of all employees in Slovenia, as statistics show that the profits of the company in the country have grown sharply, and the rise in salaries stands

One of the big trade unions is protesting a few years ago. Fight continues.

One of the big trade unions is protesting a few years ago. Fight continues.
© Borut Peterlin

Association of Free Trade Unions of Slovenia (ZSSS) and Confederation of Trade Unions of Slovenia Pergam organize a protest rally in Ljubljana two weeks later. To that effect, employers will demand higher salaries for all employees in Slovenia, and private sector unions will join private sector trade unions.

According to ZSSS President Lidija Jerkic at today's press conference in Ljubljana, some of their members have already seen the dissatisfaction of their wages with their membership. "Moreover, social dialogue in the context of collective bargaining does not take place satisfactorily," she added.

Due to unsatisfactory wage monitoring, wage growth has been strengthening for a long time, but the bottom, according to her, erupted at the last session of the Economic and Social Council regarding the adoption of a new law on minimum earnings, when employers, in exchange for 30 euros, raises the minimum wage in the cube such tripartite social dialogue at the state level, as well as negotiation of collective bargaining activities.

In other words, employers are compromised by the termination of collective agreements, she added, adding, "Before employers understand one of these things, they must be very clear that we will not eat as much as possible the termination of collective agreements."

The protest will be held on Wednesday, December 5, at 11 am in front of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Slovenia in Ljubljana. Lidija Jerkic did not want to guess how many participants she expected, but she said that all those who "feel the problem with their salary" are invited to do so.

"We want to make it very clear to employers to seek higher salaries, not only minimum wages, but also for all employees in this country," she said. Pergam President Jakob Počivaszek added that "all workers in Slovenia are earning higher profits, and in this work, public sector workers support private sector workers and vice versa."

"We want to make it very clear to employers to seek higher salaries, not just minimum wages, but also for all employees in this country."
(Lidija Jerkic, ZSSS)

The protest will be attended by members of the public sector unions. "These are demands for higher salaries, to resist the anticipated collapse of bilateral social dialogue, actively activate social dialogue and agree on higher wages in collective agreements, and in connection with this, the proposed amendment to the law on minimum wage," Povivavsek summed up.

Council members Levica submitted a proposal to amend the Law on Minimal Beaches 14 days ago with the support of members of the coalition in the parliamentary procedure. But employers oppose it, so they were not discussed at the last session of the Economic and Social Council.

"All workers in Slovenia earn higher salaries, and in this work, public sector workers support workers in the private sector and vice versa."
(Jakob Počivalšek, Pergam)

"Workers lose patience with minimal wages," Lidija Jerkic said today, adding that the ZSSS supports everything in the legal provisions, which is an increase in the minimum wage, proper alignment and elimination of benefits from it. "The difference between the lowest basic salaries according to collective agreements, real wages and minimum wages practically increases from month to month, and for us this is unacceptable," explained Počivavsek with an amendment to the law.

In order to improve the salaries of all employees in Slovenia, they are also engaged in other public sector unions. "Statistics show that the profits of the company in this country have grown sharply, and the growth of earnings significantly lagged behind this growth, especially in the last two years," said Secretary General of the Slovenian Education and Training Association, Branimir Štrukelj. According to him, they will also join forces in supporting amendments to the Minimum Wage Law: if the employers' opposition continues, the joint organization will also propose to support an increase in minimum wages.


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