Friday , August 19 2022

Facebook risks these criminal charges in more investigations into their private practices



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Annual Allen And Co. a meeting in Sun Valley attracts CEOs and business leaders in Mountain Mountain Tovn

Mark Zuckerberg (photo: Drev Angerer / Getti Images)2018 Getti Images

The Ministry of Justice may be investigating Facebook. reported New York Times, saying that a large jury in the eastern district of New York called at least two device manufacturers about their data sharing agreements with the giant social media.

Facebook faces a large-scale federal government data-management effort, so let's break the risks that this company's $ 473 billion company and its founder and CEO, Michael Zuckerberg faces

What's this new investigation about? Is it related to Cambridge Analytics?

Facebook has meta regulatory probes regarding its role Cambridge Analyticaa British firm targeting political ads that has accessed personal preferences of 87 million people on Facebook during the US general election in 2016. Facebook knew about an inappropriate approach, but he informed the users about it last year, just before New York Times i The Observer report on data breach. The SEC was reportedly investigating Facebook's public statements about the scandal, and is also allegedly under investigation by the Department of Justice in connection with the fraud of securities.

A spokeswoman for Facebook would not comment on the specific nature of the subpoena, but said: "It has been reported that they are undergoing a federal investigation, including by the Ministry of Justice. As we have already said, we cooperate with investigators and we take this trial seriously. We gave public testimony, answered questions, and promised that we would continue.

The eastern district said that, according to its usual policy, it would neither confirm nor deny that the investigation was even happening.

I heard that the Federal Trade Commission is watching Facebook. Why?

Last year FTC acknowledged to investigate the privacy practices of Facebook, starting with questions related to Cambridge Analytica, but also reported to investigate subsequent discoveries. It is focused on violating these practices decision on prior consent with the regulatory body. This decree, finalized in 2012, solved claims against Facebook and included an agreement on its future privacy practices. As a result of this investigation, Washington post recently reported that it is a regulatory body consideration of the application a multi-billion-dollar fine for a social media giant, suggesting that the FTC believes Facebook has made a mistake in the way it uses its users' data.

Facebook he claimed the exchange of user information with software partners did not violate his previous FTC Privacy Agreement, nor harmed consumers. However, as part of a 2012 settlement agreement, Facebook had to keep a record of its privacy practices so that the FTC could monitor its compliance. The request of a major jury for copies of a data sharing agreement could show that he was investigating whether Facebook was accurately reporting on these agreements. If that were not the case, it could have caught the interest of the prosecutors.

"Faking false information to the FTC and other regulators can be prosecuted," said Chris Hoofnagle, director of the Faculty of Law and Technology at Berkeley. Forbes in an email.

What could the other Ministry of Justice investigate?

Calls for data sharing agreements with device manufacturers suggest that prosecutors in the eastern district may be looking at Facebook's privacy practices outside the Cambridge Analytics case allegedly allowed phone and device vendors to access their user's personal data in ways that were an exception to the restrictions imposed by app developers. For example, allowing Apple and BlackBerry to access friends 'friends' data without their consent.

There are other laws that can be included here, except for the precise application of privacy practices, says Hoofnagle. Certain practices, he notes, could be considered "eavesdropping" if the user's communication was intercepted.

Can Mark Zuckerberg go to jail?

If Facebook has given false information to the FTC, imprisonment is a possibility, although not probable. The federal law prohibits giving false statements to the government, and this is punishable by imprisonment for up to five years. (Just ask Marta Stewart or Michael Cohen.) But the standards are quite strict: prosecutors should prove beyond reasonable doubt that the officers on Facebook "knowingly and willingly" gave false information to the FTC.

This means that prosecutors will have to show that Zuckerberg was aware of the information contained in the compliance report, that he knew that the information was false and that he voluntarily agreed to present these false information on behalf of the Facebook. Even if this happened – and now there is not much evidence to indicate that this is the case – government attorneys would find it very difficult to prove it.

As for other activities that may be explored by the DOJ, there is also the chance that Zuckerberg himself faces personal responsibility, says Hoofnagle, but at least would still be quite high to prove irregularities.

"According to other statutes, sometimes there is a certain standard articulated for personal responsibility," he said. "Much will have to do with Zuckerberg's personal decision-making direction."

More on Facebook Forbes:

Chris Cock from Facebook left after his privacy, he made millions on Facebook

Mark Zuckerberg says the future is encrypted, private messages

The security costs of Mark Zuckerberg have struck, unlike Bezos, Ellison and others

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Annual Allen And Co. a meeting in Sun Valley attracts CEOs and business leaders in Mountain Mountain Tovn

Mark Zuckerberg (photo: Drev Angerer / Getti Images)2018 Getti Images

The Ministry of Justice may be investigating Facebook New York Times, saying that a large jury in the eastern district of New York called at least two device manufacturers about their data sharing agreements with the giant social media.

Facebook faces a large-scale federal government data-management effort, so let's break the risks that this company's $ 473 billion company and its founder and CEO, Michael Zuckerberg faces

What's this new investigation about? Is it related to Cambridge Analytics?

Facebook has been the target of regulatory investigations into its role at Cambridge Analytica, a British political ad targeting agency that has accessed personal preferences of 87 million people on Facebook during the US general election in 2016. Facebook knew about an inappropriate approach, but he informed the users about it last year, just before New York Times i The Observer report on data breach. The SEC was reportedly investigating Facebook's public statements about the scandal, and is also allegedly under investigation by the Department of Justice in connection with the fraud of securities.

A spokeswoman for Facebook would not comment on the specific nature of the subpoena, but said: "It has been reported that they are undergoing a federal investigation, including by the Ministry of Justice. As we have already said, we cooperate with investigators and we take this trial seriously. We gave public testimony, answered questions, and promised that we would continue.

The eastern district said that, according to its usual policy, it would neither confirm nor deny that the investigation was even happening.

I heard that the Federal Trade Commission is watching Facebook. Why?

Last year, the FTC admits to investigating Facebook's privacy practices, starting with questions related to Cambridge Analytica, but was also reported to investigate subsequent discoveries. It focuses on whether these practices have violated a decision on prior agreement with the regulatory body. This decree, finalized in 2012, solved claims against Facebook and included an agreement on its future privacy practices. As a result of this investigation, Washington post recently reported that the regulatory body is considering the imposition of a multi-billion dollar fine on a social media giant, suggesting that the FTC believes Facebook has made a mistake in the way it handles the data of its users.

Facebook claimed that sharing user information with software partners did not violate its previous privacy agreement with the FTC, nor did it harm consumers. However, as part of a 2012 settlement agreement, Facebook had to keep a record of its privacy practices so that the FTC could monitor its compliance. The request of a major jury for copies of a data sharing agreement could show that he was investigating whether Facebook was accurately reporting on these agreements. If that were not the case, it could have caught the interest of the prosecutors.

"Faking false information to the FTC and other regulators can be prosecuted," said Chris Hoofnagle, director of the Faculty of Law and Technology at Berkeley. Forbes in an email.

What could the other Ministry of Justice investigate?

These are calls for data sharing agreements with device manufacturers that suggest that prosecutors in the eastern district may be considering privacy practices on Facebook outside the Cambridge Analytics case, as allegedly allowed by phone and device manufacturers to access personal data in a way that was an exception to the restrictions which they set up for application developers. For example, allowing Apple and BlackBerry to access friends 'friends' data without their consent.

There are other laws that can be included here, except for the precise application of privacy practices, says Hoofnagle. Certain practices, he notes, could be considered "eavesdropping" if the user's communication was intercepted.

Can Mark Zuckerberg go to jail?

If Facebook has given false information to the FTC, imprisonment is a possibility, although not probable. The federal law prohibits giving false statements to the government, and this is punishable by imprisonment for up to five years. (Just ask Marta Stewart or Michael Cohen.) But the standards are quite strict: prosecutors should prove beyond reasonable doubt that the officers on Facebook "knowingly and willingly" gave false information to the FTC.

This means that prosecutors will have to show that Zuckerberg was aware of the information contained in the compliance report, that he knew that the information was false and that he voluntarily agreed to present these false information on behalf of the Facebook. Even if this happened – and now there is not much evidence to indicate that this is the case – government attorneys would find it very difficult to prove it.

As for other activities that may be explored by the DOJ, there is also the chance that Zuckerberg himself faces personal responsibility, says Hoofnagle, but at least would still be quite high to prove irregularities.

"According to other statutes, sometimes there is a certain standard articulated for personal responsibility," he said. "Much will have to do with Zuckerberg's personal decision-making direction."

More on Facebook Forbes:

Chris Cock from Facebook left after his privacy, he made millions on Facebook

Mark Zuckerberg says the future is encrypted, private messages

The security costs of Mark Zuckerberg have struck, unlike Bezos, Ellison and others

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